Property Apr 4, 2022

You’re buying the house not the furniture

4 min read

You're-buying-the-house-not-the-furtniture
You're-buying-the-house-not-the-furtniture

When it comes to fixtures and fittings, it’s important to know that you don’t get to keep everything you see when inspecting a property.

Remember, you’re buying the house not the furniture.

Let’s face it, we’re all at some point a sucker when it comes to a good marketing campaign. We’ve all bought something because the ad has ‘spoken’ to us. Maybe it’s the subject matter, maybe it’s the ambassador or maybe we just want to buy into the lifestyle on offer. Whether you realise or not, it’s often the case when people buy homes too.

That perfectly manicured garden leading into an exquisitely styled home that just happens to have too much of the furniture you’ve aspired to buy. I can tell you as a Vendor’s Advocate and often the person who’s put all of this together – it’s not an accident.

Vendor Agents, real estate agents and vendors work hard to make the property appeal to the right demographic. They help the buyer forget they’re not buying a building, they’re buying a lifestyle. And from the location through to the appliances, wallpaper and the name of the architect or interior designer – each of these things has been carefully thought out. Especially in premium property.

Don’t be fooled by clever styling.

Sometimes it can be as simple as putting in the right furniture to give the property a look and feel that appeals to the target market. Sometimes it’s also to hide the fact that the house is nothing special on its own.

Something I often tell my buyers is that it is important to remember what you’re buying… location, orientation, and hopefully a house that you can make your own and that suits your needs and budget. You are often not buying the beautiful rug, the Noguchi coffee table or the beautiful piece of artwork on the wall. In fact, very rarely in Australia will you find a house for sale fully furnished.

When it comes to buying a property, certain things will stay (known as fixtures) when the property changes hands and other things will go (known as goods). Anything that is fixed such as the oven, light fittings and floor coverings will stay but anything that can be moved is a good and may or may not stay such as window coverings, dishwasher or dryer.

Forget how dreamy the couch and rug combo is and look at the condition of the floor underneath it. What about the walls behind that beautiful piece of artwork, are there any cracks? Does the property need restumping and are the windows watertight? Because when the furniture is removed, that’s what you’re left with.

Think about how your belonging will look in there and don’t be fooled by good advertising, getting a great house at a great price will mean you can get your own stylist in. Buying a house you think is great but ends up needing a lot of work could cost you more than a couch – I’ll say it again, you’re buying the house not the furniture.

By Antoinette Sagaria